Steve Walts Has Joined the Server

Anthony Marovelli, Writer

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Twitter and social media may seem like second nature to many of the students at Woodbridge. It seems like most have at least one account somewhere, where they make posts and get caught up socially. However, in many ways, social media is still entirely new. There’s so many new avenues and uses that have yet to be explored. One such use, is keeping the school and the surrounding county connected. The superintendent of Prince William County Schools, Steve Walts has done just this through his twitter. He has found a way to not only provide the county with information, but build and develop relationships with the student body.

Walts became Superintendent in 2005, and according to his account, made his twitter in October 2014. However his first tweet seemingly wasn’t until November of last year. A charming, “Hello Twitter! #myfirsttweet,” is the post he made. It only grew from there. This year PWCS hit a particularly rough patch with snow days, and Walts would announce each code red with a post on his twitter. Through this it became evident just how much students love a day off from school, and each code red would be showered with love and appreciation. Students would send him their messages of thanks, funny edited images of him, or even pictures of their own pets. Two students actually brought him a cake. This was all in the name of appreciating Walts.

In turn, Walts began to reply and become more active. His calls for no school became more clever and exciting. The highlights of these were his song parodies. One such parody was a piano melody reflecting the tune and lyrics of Frozen’s famed “Let it Go,” but personalized to be about the students of PWCS and their desire for a snow day.

Walts now has 18.5k followers, which is a huge platform for anyone. Yet, he is using it to the best of his abilities. He puts the hard work of students, teachers, and the schools themselves on display. Eleventh Grade student, Darius Babb, told how through Walts’ Twitter he was able to “see him as more of a person then just a figure that oversees all.” Babb hopes more teachers and administrators will take this route and become more active on twitter in a similar fashion to Walts.

WSHS students are probably used to there being a school presence on social media by now. Tons of clubs and activities have their own pages, and even Principal Abney is fairly active on her Twitter. However, Walts has made connections on a county-wide scale, and crafted a sense of connectivity between the schools that may not have been felt otherwise. Social continue to prove to be a useful tool for not only the youth, but everyone.